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Tears in the Fence is an independent literary journal established in November 1984. Our tri-annual publication includes poetry, prose, translations, reviews and essays by established writers from around the world. We embrace neo-Romantic, modernist and post-modernist developments in British and American poetry and have been an outlet for prominent poets associated with the British Poetry Revival as well as later generations of British, black and Asian poets. We  have editorial bases in UK, France and USA.

Tears in the Fence, Autumn 2014, issue 60. Sneak cover preview. Limited First Edition now at the printer’s. Order/subscribe now to reserve your copy.

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The current issue:

Issue 59 has a gorgeous Dorset coastal cover and is designed by Westrow Cooper. We have poetry from Lucy Burnett, Anne Gorrick, Colin Sutherill, Peter Larkin, Mark Goodwin, Chris Hall, Sue Chenette, Gerald Locklin, Lesley Burt, June English, Sheila Hamilton, Rachel Sills, Mandy Pannett, Janet Rogerson, Valerie Bridge, Seàn Street, Charles Hadfield, Natalie Bradbeer, Grahaeme Barrasford Young, Charles Wilkinson, Eleanor Rees, Christos Sakellaridis, Carole Birkan, James Bell, Gerald Locklin, Simon Jenner, Rosie Jackson, Geraldine Clarkson and Steve Spence.

We have fiction from Stefan Zweig translated by William Ruleman, Elizabeth Stott and Nicolas Ridley, and nonfiction by Caroline Clark.

Our critical section includes David Caddy’s Editorial, Anthony Barnett’s Antonym: A Disaccumulation of Knowledge, A Conversation Piece with John Freeman by Gavin Goodwin, Jennifer K. Dick’s Of Tradition and Experiment X: Five Small Press Publications, Peter Hughes on John Hall, Ben Hickman on Keston Sutherland, Norman Jope on recent Waterloo Press books, Elizabeth Stott on Kathleen Jones’ biography of Norman Nicholson, Juha Virtanen on recent Knives Forks and Spoons Press publications, Tom Jenks on Robert Sheppard, Mandy Pannett on Valerie Bridge, Rosie Jackson’s Between The Lines, Anthony Barnett’s Antonym: Gunnar Ekelöf ’s Table and Ian Brinton’s Afterword.

Issue 58 has a winter woodland cover and is designed by Westrow Cooper. We have poetry by Paul Kareem Tayyar, Giles Goodland, Robert Vas Dias, Sarah James, Rupert Loydell, Simon Turner, Anamaría Crowe Serrano, Kat Peddie, Tim Cresswell, David Andrew, Jeffrey Graessley, Simon Zonenblick, Jay Ramsay, Lydia Padellec, Malcolm Povey, Carrie Etter, Ian Seed, Nicky Mesch, Hilda Sheehan, Richard Evans, Alice Lyons, Mike Duggan, Michael Grant, Sheila Hamilton, Andrew Darlington, Dorothy Lehane, Aidan Semmens, Dan O’Brien, Rosie Jackson, Simon Currie, L.Kiew, Matt Haw, Jennifer K. Dick, Sarah Crewe, Michael Henry,  Peter Dent and Norman Jope.

We have fiction by Melissa Lee-Houghton, Alice Wooledge Salmon, Michael Sforza, Lisa Mansell and Sascha Akhtar.

Our critical section includes Jennifer K. Dick on Habib Tengour, Peter Hughes on Ed Dorn, Norman Jope on Gertrude Kolmar, Laurie Duggan on Gig Ryan, Oliver Dixon on Jorie Graham, David Caddy on Jim Burns, Jennifer K. Dick, Dzifa Benson on Linda Black, Fani Papageorgiou, Cora Greenhill on Sally Goldsmith, Jay Ramsay on Simon Jenner, Ian Brinton on D.H. Lawrence, selections from the Ian Brinton / Andrew Crozier Correspondence, Brian Hinton on David Caddy, plus regular columnists David Caddy, Rosie Jackson, Anthony Barnett and Ian Brinton.

Issue 57 has a beautiful cover and is designed by Westrow Cooper. It features poetry by Sean Street, Elizabeth Welsh, Lou Wilford, Pansy Maurer-Alvarez, Ben Hickman, Karoline von Günderrode Trans. Gwendolyn Jensen and Monika Totten, Zack Nelson-Lopiccolo, Peter Carpenter, Paul Kareem Tayyar, Rosie Jackson, Isobel Armstrong, Sarah Miller, Sean Elliott, Paul Matthews, Alexandra Sashe, Claire Crowther, Alistair Noon, Mélisande Fitzsimons, Gerard Greenway, Adam Fieled, Jennifer Compton, Kevin McCann, David Kennedy, Dorothy Lehane, James Bell, Andrew Shelley, Melinda Lovell, Peter Robinson, Tess Joyce, Tim Allen, Jaime Robles, Geraldine Clarkson, Gavin Selerie, Steve Spence and Eleanor Perry.

We have fiction by Lori Jakiela, Steven Earnshaw, Susmita Bhattacharya, Simon Howells, Alison Lock, Noel King and David Goldstein.

Our critical section features selections from Letters From Andrew Crozier to Ian Brinton, Andrew Duncan on Fiona Sampson’s Beyond The Lyric, Chrissy Williams on Chris McCabe, Michael Grant On Writing, Laurie Duggan on Geraldine Monk’s Cusp, Jeremy Hilton on David Caddy, John Welch, Robert Hampson on Ben Hickman, Sheila Hamilton on Melissa Lee-Houghton, Lindsey Holland, Frances Spurrier on The Best of British Poetry, Mandy Pannett on Rocco Scotellaro, Ian Brinton on Donald Davie, Jay Ramsay on Norman Jope, Pauline Stainer, Michael Grant on Anthony Barnett, Ric Hool on Mario Petrucci, Richard Humphreys on Clive Wilmer, Ben Hickman on Wide Range Chapbooks, Gabriel Millar on Jehanne Mehta, Rosie Jackson’s Between The Lines
 column, Anthony Barnett’s Antonyms column and Ian Brinton’s Afterword.

Issue 56 is a large 176 page book designed by Westrow Cooper. It features poetry by Michael Grant, Melinda Lovell, Simon Smith, K.V. Skene, Mark Goodwin, S.J. Litherland, Peter Hughes, Jay Ramsay, Louise Anne Buchler, Ami Kaye, Michael Henry, Ric Hool, Anamaria Crowe Serrano, Sophie Boucher, David Greenslade, Tim Allen, Chrissy Williams, Aaron Belz, Megan Watkins, Rebecca Schmejda, Matt Bryden, Sheila Hamilton, Sarah Crewe, Simon Perril, Bethany Pope, Tania Hershman, John Latta, Geraldine Clarkson, Steve Spence, Lynne Wycherley, Jeremy Reed, Fani Papageorgiou and many others.

We have fiction by John Brantingham, Rani Drew, Sandra Glaze, Frederick Lightfoot and James Wall.

There are also some visual poems by Sarah Kelly and an extract from David Caddy’s Cycling After Thomas And The English.

Our critical section features Jennifer K. Dick on ‘What’s Avant-Garde in the 21st Century’, Jeremy Reed on Robert Duncan, Laura Burns on Elisabeth Bletsoe, Harriet Tarlo’s The Ground Aslant, Michael Grant on Anthony Barnett, Ian Brinton on Michael Heller, Laurie Duggan on Michael Bolton, Mandy Pannett on Catherine Edmunds, Peter Carpenter on Mathew Hollis and Edward Thomas, Steve Spence on David Harsent, Philip Kuhn, Rosie Jackson’ s Between The Lines and Anthony Barnett’s Antonyms, Ian Brinton’s Afterword plus much more.

As wonderfully diverse as ever, issue 55, a bumper 176 page issue, features the poetry of Hannah Silva, Edward Field, Sheila Hamilton, Yves Bonnefoy, translated by Ian Brinton and Michael Grant, Sheila E. Murphy, Rupert M. Loydell, Suzanne Allen, Mark Goodwin, Melinda Lovell, Paul Tayyar, Adam Fieled, Amy McCauley, Melissa Lee-Houghton, Helen Moore, Norman Jope, Andy Brown, Ian Seed, Kimberley Campanello, Geraldine Clarkson, S.J. Litherland, Jeremy Reed, Robert Sheppard, Aidan Semmens and many others.

We have fiction from Sascha Akhtar, Neil Campbell, Diana Gittins, David Goldstein, Catherine McNamara and Elizabeth Stott.

Our critical section features regular columnists, Jennifer K. Dick, Rosie Jackson and Anthony Barnett, Ian Brinton on Andrew Crozier and the Ferry Press, John Hall on John Wieners with Gilbert & George, John Welch on Barry Flanagan, Nigel Wheale on Peter Hughes, Laurie Duggan on Geraldine Monk, Ric Hool on Anne Cluysenar, Peter Riley on Nathan Thompson and many other reviews and articles.

You can like our page or join our group on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, subscribe to the magazine AND newsletter and donate to our cause – it’s easy, just look at the sidebar on the right and click away.

Issue 54 is jam packed with poetry, translation and prose by the likes of Elizabeth Barrett, Kate Guthrie Caruso, Rita Dahl, Carrie Etter, Lindsey Holland, John Kinsella, Gerald Locklin, Ziba Karbassi, Mark Newell, Anamaria Crowe Serrano, Séan Street, Jessie Volk and Grahaeme Barrasford Young. The critical section includes Jennifer K. Dick on Michelle Naka Pierce, Ian Brinton on Nigel Wheale, Norman Jope on New Order: Hungarian Poets of the Post 1989 Generation, John Welch on Fawzi Karim, Valeria Melchioretti on Gill Gregory, Steve Spence on Tim Allen and Rupert Loydell, Anthony Barnett’s Antonyms on Aimé Cesaire and D.S. Marriott, Sarah Hopkins’s Noise From Cabin and David Caddy’s Afterword.


“The only literary magazine in the UK that lets the margins and the great tradition speak. It is a book to treasure.” Ketaki Kushari Dyson


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