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Tag Archives: David Caddy

Tears in the Fence 71

Tears in the Fence 71

Tears in the Fence 71 is now available at
https://tearsinthefence.com/pay-it-forward and features poetry, multilingual poetry, prose poetry, fiction and flash fiction from James Roome, James Russell, Sarah Cave, Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani, Ric Hool, Martin Stannard, Lee Duggan, Ralph Hawkins, Peter Larkin, John Welch, Vanessa Lampert, Kat Dixon, Norman Jope, Sian Thomas, Richard Foreman, Jessica Saxby, Charles Hadfield, Cherry Smyth, Mark Russell, Rachael Clyne, Peter J. King, Freya Jackson, Gavin Selerie, David Miller, William Gilson, Greg Bright, Colin Sutherill, Lucy Ingrams, David Sahner, Jennifer K. Dick, Reuben Woolley, Rhea Seren Phillips, Mandy Pannett, Georgi Gill and Simon Jenner.

The critical section consists of Ian Brinton’s Editorial, Simon Jenner on Jay Ramsay, Joseph Persad on Helen Moore, Carrie Etter, Harriet Tarlo, Caroline Maldonado on Cherry Smyth, Mandy Pannett on Michael Farrell, Norman Jope on Jeremy Reed, Ian Seed on Jeremy Over, Steve Spence on Maria Stadnicka, Helen Moore on Naomi Foyle, Steve Spence on Emily Critchley, Ian Brinton on David Miller, David Cooke on Peter Riley, Seán Street on Voices and Books in the English Renaissance, Richard Foreman on Gill Horitz, David Caddy on Natalia Ginzburg, Giovanni Pascoli, Keith Jebb on Alan Halsey, Paul Matthews on Sian Thomas, Clark Allison on Marjorie Perloff, Morag Kiziewicz’s Electric Blue 6, Notes on Contributors and David Caddy’s Afterword.

David Caddy 4th March 2020

Mentoring Services

Mentoring Services

If you have a troubling collection or are uncertain about your literary work and the way forward, why not use the Tears in the Fence Mentoring and Critical Appraisal services? The editors, Louise Buchler and David Caddy offer a range of services in poetry, fiction, drama, performance, scriptwriting and voice work.

Playwright, Performance Studies Lecturer, actress and poet, Louise Buchler is offering Mentoring in Scriptwriting and Verse Drama under the same scheme. She has more than twelve years of experience lecturing in Writing for both Stage and Screen. She made the shortlist for the National Theatre London’s Africa Playwriting Competition recognising her as one of the top twenty playwrights on the African continent. Her plays have been widely performed. Her poetry has been published in Tears in the Fence and various publications in South Africa. Louise is also available for Performance and Voice coaching. Please email Louise at tearsinthefence@gmail.com

Poet, essayist and editor, David Caddy offers critical appraisals and mentoring in Poetry, Flash Fiction and Publication for other literary genres and projects. This involves taking a manuscript from first draft to publication, advising on where to send your work and the range of available options for a prospective poet and author.

Recent comments on their mentoring include:

‘I think you’ve both given me some excellent points to think about, particularly with regard to tightening up the poems and perhaps even switching up the order. Joanna Nissel

‘David and Louise offer a wonderful critical and supportive service at a moderate price. They provide detailed appraisals with follow-up conversations and have considerably helped my progress in a challenging area.’ Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani

‘The appraisals from David and Louise were thoughtful and precise. Their feedback ranged from specific matters of craft to the broader question of how I might take my writing forward. They responded to the work on its own terms and even picked up on recurring motifs and concerns I hadn’t been aware of myself.’ Phil Baber

‘David’s critical appraisals are immeasurably helpful. His work
towards my first full collection was immensely useful.’ Jessica Mookherjee

‘David’s close and perceptive reading of each poem, help with ordering and sequencing my pamphlet collections, and support with my first full collection has been enormous. I thoroughly recommend his critical and mentoring services.’ Geraldine Clarkson

For more details visit
https://tearsinthefence.com/mentoring

Mentoring and Critical Appraisals

The Tears in the Fence editors now offer more Mentoring and Critical Appraisals in poetry, drama, performance, scriptwriting and voice work.

Playwright, Performance Studies Lecturer, and poet, Louise Buchler is offering Mentoring in Scriptwriting and Verse Drama under the same scheme. She has more than twelve years of experience lecturing in Writing for both Stage and Screen. She made the shortlist for the National Theatre London’s Africa Playwriting Competition recognising her as one of the top twenty playwrights on the African continent. Her plays have been widely performed. Her poetry has been published in Tears in the Fence and various publications in South Africa. Louise is also available for Performance and Voice coaching. Please email Louise at tearsinthefence@gmail.com

Poet, essayist and editor, David Caddy offers critical appraisals and mentoring in Poetry, Flash Fiction and Publication for other literary genres and projects. This involves taking a manuscript from first draft to publication, advising on where to send your work and the range of available options for a prospective poet and author.

Recent comments on their mentoring include:

‘The appraisals from David and Louise were thoughtful and precise. Their feedback ranged from specific matters of craft to the broader question of how I might take my writing forward. They responded to the work on its own terms and even picked up on recurring motifs and concerns I hadn’t been aware of myself.’ Phil Baber

‘David’s critical appraisals are immeasurably helpful. His work
towards my first full collection was immensely useful.’ Jessica Mookherjee

‘David’s close and perceptive reading of each poem, help with ordering and sequencing my pamphlet collections, and support with my first full collection has been enormous. I thoroughly recommend his critical and mentoring services.’ Geraldine Clarkson

For more details visit
https://tearsinthefence.com/mentoring

Tears in the Fence 64

Tears in the Fence 64

Tears in the Fence 64 edited by David Caddy is now available from https://tearsinthefence.com/pay-it-forward and features poetry, fiction, prose poetry and translations from Jeremy Reed, Jim Burns, John Welch, John Freeman, Sally Dutton, Chris Hall, Michael Henry, Beth Davyson, Kinga Tóth, Paul Kareem Tayyar, D. I., Lydia Unsworth, David Pollard, Mike Duggan, Jeff Hilson, Sheila Mannix, I.S. Rowley, Richard Foreman, Jay Ramsay, Alison Winch, Andrew Taylor, Alan Baker, Sophie Herxheimer, L. Kiew, Ric Hool, S.J. Litherland, Rachael Clyne, Andrew Shelley, Tom Cowin, Morag Kiziewicz, Matt Bryden, Jessica Mookherjee, John Phillips, Ian Brinton & Michael Grant trans. Mallarmé, Terence J. Dooley trans. Mario Martin Giljó, Greg Bachar, Jennifer K. Dick, Matthew Carbery, Mark Goodwin, Aidan Semmens, Peter Dent, Sarah Cave, Julie Irigaray and Maria Isokova Bennett.
The critical section features John Freeman on Jim Burns: Poet as Witness, Andrew Henon on Timeless Man: Sven Berlin, Mary Woodward on Rosemary Tonks & Veronica Forrest-Thomson, Jeremy Reed on John Wieners, Norman Jope on Chris McCabe, Marsha de la O in conversation with John Brantingham, Neil Leadbeater on Jeremy Hilton, Nancy Gaffield on Geraldine Monk, Lesley Saunders on Alice Miller, Belinda Cooke on Carole Satyamurti, Steve Spence on Dear World and Everyone in it David Caddy on Andrew Lees’ Mentored by a Madman, Nigel Wood & Alan Halsey, Duncan Mackay on E.E. Cummings
, Notes on Contributors, and Ian Brinton’s Afterword.
The front cover is a black & white detail of a Sven Berlin watercolour (1982, private collection) and the magazine is designed by Westrow Cooper.

Tears in the Fence 60

Tears in the Fence 60

Tears in the Fence marks its Thirtieth Anniversary with a poetry Festival 24-26th October, and the publication of issue 60.

Tears in the Fence 60 is now available from https://tearsinthefence.com/pay-it-forward and features poetry and fiction from Lucy Hamilton, John Freeman, Ric Hool, Francis Ponge translated by Ian Brinton, Lynne Wycherley, James Midgley, George Ttoouli, Melinda Lovell, Michael Farrell, Paul A. Green, Norman Jope, Rethabile Masilo, Jo Mazelis, Helen Copley. Saint James Harris Wood, Paul Kareem Tayyar, Linda Black, Jeremy Reed, Peter King, David Ball, John Torrance, Jay Ramsay, Dorothy Lehane, Caroline Maldonado, Mark Dickinson, Michael Henry, Amy McCauley, Lesley Burt, Deya Mukherjee, Colin Sutherill, L. Kiew, Adam Fieled, Rob Stanton, Steve Spence, Colin McCabe, Elaine Randell, Mandy Pannett and Mark Russell. There is also a Conversation Piece between Fiona Owen and Ric Hool.

The critical section includes Hannah Silva’s Make It Strange, Jennifer K. Dick’s Of Tradition & Experiment, Anthony Barnett’s Antonyms, Belinda Cooke on recent translations, Basil King’s Learning to Draw / A History, Ben Hickman on Tony Lopez, Jeremy Hilton on Andrew Taylor, sean burn, Ric Hool, Peter Hughes on Women’s Experimental Poetry in Britain, Philip Crozier on Andrew Crozier in Hastings, Gavin Goodwin on Thomas A. Clark, Mandy Pannett on Simon Jarvis, David Caddy on John Goodby’s The Poetry of Dylan Thomas, Rosie Jackson’s Between The Lines, Notes on Contributors and Ian Brinton’s Afterword.

Tears in the Fence 57 is out!

Tears in the Fence 57 is out!

Tears in the Fence 57 is out! It is available from https://tearsinthefence.com/pay-it-forward/ and features poetry and fiction by Sean Street, Elizabeth Welsh, Lou Wilford, Pansy Maurer-Alvarez, Ben Hickman, Karoline von Günderrode, Lori Jakiela, Paul Kareem Tayyar, Rosie Jackson, Isobel Armstrong, Steven Earnshaw, Sarah Miller, Paul Matthews, Alexandra Sashe, Susmita Bhattacharya, Claire Crowther, Alistair Noon, Mélisande Fitzsimons, Gerard Greenway, Adam Fieled, Jennifer Compton, Alison Lock, Kevin McCann, Dorothy Lehane, Andrew Shelley, Melinda Lovell, Peter Robinson, Tess Joyce, Tim Allen, Jaime Robles, Noel King,  Geraldine Clarkson, Gavin Selerie, Steve Spence, Eleanor Perry and many others.

 

The critical section includes selections from Letters From Andrew Crozier to Ian Brinton, Andrew Duncan on Fiona Sampson’s Beyond The Lyric, Chrissy Williams on Chris McCabe, Michael Grant On Writing, Laurie Duggan on Geraldine Monk’s Cusp, Jeremy Hilton on David Caddy, John Welch, Robert Hampson on Ben Hickman, Sheila Hamilton on Melissa Lee-Houghton, Lindsey Holland, Frances Spurrier on The Best of British Poetry, Mandy Pannett on Rocco Scotellaro, Ian Brinton on Donald Davie, Jay Ramsay on Norman Jope, Pauline Stainer, Michael Grant on Anthony Barnett, Ric Hool on Mario Petrucci, Richard Humphreys on Clive Wilmer, Ben Hickman on Wide Range Chapbooks, and regular columnists David Caddy, Rosie Jackson, Anthony Barnett and Ian Brinton.

 

 

 

 

Tears in the Fence 56

Tears in the Fence 56

Tears in the Fence 56, designed by Westrow Cooper, is 176 pages and features poetry by Peter Hughes, S.J. Litherland, Aaron Belz, Michael Grant, John Latta, Geraldine Clarkson, Sarah Crewe, Mark Goodwin, Steve Spence, Louise Anne Buchler, Chrissy Williams, Papageorgiou, Lynne Wycherley, fiction by John Brantingham, James Wall, visual poems by Sarah Kelly, and extract from David Caddy’s Cycling After Thomas And The English.

The critical section features Jennifer K. Dick and What’s Avant-Garde in the 21st Century, Jeremy Reed on Robert Duncan, Laura Burns on Elisabeth Bletsoe, Harriet Tarlo’s The Ground Aslant, Michael Grant on Anthony Barnett, Ian Brinton on Michael Heller, Laurie Duggan on Michael Bolton, Mandy Pannett on Catherine Edmunds, Peter Carpenter on Mathew Hollis and Edward Thomas, Steve Spence on David Harsent, Philip Kuhn, Rosie Jackson’ s Between The Lines and Anthony Barnett’s Antonyms, plus much more.

Order, subscribe and pay online at http://tearsinthefence.com

A Various Art

A Various Art

Twenty-five years ago Carcanet published an anthology of poems edited by Andrew Crozier and Tim Longville. Crozier had been, of course, the founder of Ferry Press and Longville, in close collaboration with both John Riley and Gordon Jackson, had been the founder of Grosseteste Press. The introduction to A Various Art opens assertively:

 

This anthology represents our joint view of what is most interesting, valuable, and distinguished in the work of a generation of English poets now entering its maturity, but it is not an anthology of English, let alone British poetry. We did not begin with this distinction in mind; indeed, had we done so it might have appeared that there were no operative criteria by which to proceed. We knew this was not the case. Why, then, make such a distinction, as though the work of English or British poets did not belong to the general category of their national poetry?

 

The poets included in this seminal anthology are central to the developing quality of poetry in this country and many of them are still writing and publishing. In the words of Iain Sinclair, from his introduction to another central anthology Conductors of Chaos, ‘If these things are difficult, they have earned that right. Why should they be easy? Why should they not reflect some measure of the complexity of the climate in which they exist? Why should we not be prepared to make an effort, to break sweat, in hope of high return? There’s no key, no Masonic password; take the sequences gently, a line at a time. Treat the page as a block, sound it for submerged sonar effects. Suspend conditioned reflexes.’

Sinclair’s point is that ‘if it comes too sweetly, somebody is trying to sell you something.’

The names in A Various Art: Anthony Barnett, David Chaloner, Andrew Crozier, Roy Fisher, Veronica Forrest-Thomson, John Hall, Ralph Hawkins, John James, Tim Longville, Douglas Oliver, Peter Philpott, J.H. Prynne, John Riley, Peter Riley, John Seed, Iain Sinclair, Nick Totton.

In the current issue of PN Review there is an account of David Caddy’s So Here We Are (Shearsman Press) and its concluding sentence makes a point that associates Caddy’s work with precisely the assertive statements informing the introduction to A Various Art:

 

‘Beneath the attractive guise of belles-lettres we are alerted to the timbre of dissident voices whose music will continue to be heard through the jamming signals put out by the official keepers of the canon.’

 

Happy New Year to our readers.

 

 

New book on J.H. Prynne: Levity of Design

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, based in Newcastle upon Tyne, has just produced a new book on Prynne’s poetry. Written by Wit Píetrzak, an Assistant Professor in the Department of British Literature and Culture at the University of Lódź in Poland, this book is divided into four sections:

 

  1. Subjectivity under Siege
  2. Disentangling the Subject
  3. Beyond Stagnation
  4. Stories of Disentanglement in Blue Slides at Rest

 

The author’s acknowledgements page conveys an engagement with the work which is thoroughly explored in this splendid new book. Wit Píetrzak writes that his book ‘is the result of a sudden, yet profound fascination with the poetry of J.H. Prynne. Not only has his work exerted an enormous influence over my

understanding and appreciation of poetry but also has brought about changes in my perception of the task of the literary critic.’

 

‘There are books that we simply have to write, in order to put in writing the genuine amazement with a particular oeuvre, to phrase the peculiar thrall in which it has kept us; this is one of those books.’

 

On a personal note it is heartening to see that there are numerous quotations in this book from David Caddy, Rod Mengham, Simon Perril and Nigel Wheale whose essays on Prynne appeared in A Manner of Utterance: The Poetry of J.H. Prynne, edited by Ian Brinton (Shearsman 2009). Ian will be contributing an account of the late Prynne poem, ‘As Mouth Blindness’, to Tears  57.

 

Thanks to Peter Riley I now have a copy of the review of Kitchen Poems that Douglas Oliver wrote for a Cambridge newspaper. Titled ‘Pioneer in Poetry’ it is a refreshing view of that early sequence of pieces that had first appeared in Andrew Crozier’s The English Intelligencer. Here is a taster:

 

‘Prynne’s verse-line is often itself a glissade, but an intricate one always subject to a masterly use of pause. Line-endings and beginnings are important clues to what he is doing, partly because of the way they make meaning stagger into the awkward and difficult entrances and partly as a clue to the glissade’s return and departure.’

Beats and Outsiders

Jim Burns’s new volume of essays from Penniless Press Publications is a real delight. This third collection of essays and reviews, following on the heels of Beats, Bohemians and Intellectuals and Radicals, Beats and Beboppers, includes fascinating pieces on the world of the sixties in England. Writing in 1970 about the poetry scene for instance Jim notes that Andrew Crozier’s The English Intelligencer was ‘to my mind the spur to much of the present activity in this sphere.’ He flags up important names from that time, names which have grown impressively over the years:

‘Lists of names are not the best way to prove a point, but the following poets need to be mentioned in this article. Lee Harwood, for my money one of the best young English moderns (see his The White Room, Fulcrum Press) and a genuinely international avant-gardist; his early influences were as much French surrealists as American Beats, Tom Raworth, curiously disjointed at times, but with an original point of view, Chris Torrance, whose Green Orange Purple Red(Ferry Press) catches the moods and rhythms of contemporary life far better than any of the so-called “pop” poets, David Chaloner, with a fragmentary style which, at its best, skilfully translates shifting impressions into poetry. And John Temple, too little known or published here unfortunately. Like Harwood and Crozier he’s spent some time in the USA, and has naturally absorbed American technical innovations and applied them to his own experiences in the North-East of England.’

Incidentally, catch hold of the latest issue of Angel Exhaust which contains a David Chaloner section of previously unpublished material as well as an overview of the poet by David Caddy:

Angel Exhaust 22

A David Chaloner memorial. By singular good fortune AE has been given access to the archive of his letters. We chose a time of dialogue with John Hall. David’s poems take place in a ‘permanent present’ and these remarkable letters are meant to recover a ‘deep present’, the Now in which the poems were written. This feature presents a moment of time preserved like a crystal, a formative moment for poetry. It is 1969 and: & just abt to begin Jeremy Prynne’s book The White Stones have you seen that at all What have you been doing since our last letter & where are your poems appearing I’ve not seen any for such a long time Did you see the last copy of collection &  the last resuscitator I thought you’d’ve been there

160 pp. cost £7.00 including postage. cheques payable to Andrew Duncan. at 21 Querneby Road, Nottingham, Notts NG3 5JA.

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